*religion

For the exhibition Do It at Kunsthal Rotterdam we created the work *religion. It is based on an instruction (a do it) by the Polish artist Paweł Althamer:


THE TEST FOR HUMANITY

READ IT ALOUD, SLOWLY,
AND THEN TAKE A DEEP BREATH



We took the Rifleman's Creed – part of classic military doctrine and meant to speak out loud. By adding an asterisk (*) after every rifle and replacing it with religion the creed completely changes. It makes you read it again, think again.

The outcome is a reflection on your religion, beliefs and principles. It condemns all violence in the name of one God, one religion or any conviction. Holding up a mirror for humanity – the test for humanity.

The handwritten typography was originally written on a handkerchief. It was transformed into a 450 x 150 cm black flag of paper which was installed in the exhibition.

Next to the installation we made a screen print of *religion. To emphasize the deeper meaning of the work we printed with blood. The screen print is available in an edition of 10. Signed and numbered on the back.



ATTAK, June 2015

 






do it at Kunsthal
The Kunsthal Rotterdam proudly presents do it, a project by internationally renowned curator Hans Ulrich Obrist. This innovative exhibition concept consists of do it instructions by world famous artists including Carsten Höller, Yoko Ono, Gilbert & George, Maurizio Cattelan, Ilya Kabakov and Erwin Wurm.

In collaboration with guest curator Jeroen Everaert, director of Mothership, over fifty do it instructions have been selected to be realised at the Kunsthal.

Opperclaes, a platform for young contemporary art, will select contemporary calligraphers and muralists ─ including Guido de Boer, Thomas Trum & Koen Taselaar, ATTAK, The Phoney Club, Bijdevleet en Joseph Hughes ─ to visualise do it instructions.

More info about the Do It can be found here.

Visit Kunsthal
Visit Opperclaes
Visit Mothership
Visit Paweł Althamer

Opperclaes & Kunsthal / Rotterdam / 2015











The history of do it
The do it project started out in 1993 in Paris as a conversation between curator Hans Ulrich Obrist and the artists Christian Boltanski and Bertrand Lavier. They wanted to make an exhibition that would continually generate new versions of itself in a similar fashion to the conceptual, minimalist and Fluxus practices of the 1960s and 1970s. In order to test this idea, they invited twelve artists to write instructions for art that could be interpreted over and again for each new presentation. Even after twenty years, this open ‘exhibition model' is as topical as ever and gives new meaning to the concept of ‘an exhibition in progress'. Every do it exhibition is realised in consultation with the local community, and at the same time develops internationally with each new version of itself. The first do it took place in 1994 at the Ritter Kunsthalle in Klagenfurt, Austria.
 


Vernissage do it, Kunsthal, Rotterdam





The screen printing of *religion